Wooden Window Workshop Coming April 21st

When I was in elementary school and had just read a historical fiction that described how they had to make substitute glass for homes on the prairie, I  (quite naturally, I might add) asked my mother if she had glass when she was young.  I am now forty-two and I have still not lived that down.

Actually, windows are a big deal in a historic neighborhood.  Everyone wants energy efficiency but what about energy efficiency in a historic home?  The windows are an intrinsic part of the look of a historic home.

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Some people get around juggling historic integrity and energy efficiency by buying a new home in the District.  Several companies build new with a historic flavor. The house below is in Jered Square on Benge Street just a block north from Finch Park.  This is certainly a way to go.  This particular house has a fireplace opening on the front porch. Very cool.

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

But there are a lot of homes that are in need of renovations or are currently being redone. If you have invested in your new “old” dreamhouse or if you are investing on spec, where is the balance? What if there was a way to keep the pretty old windows and make them energy efficient?

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

The City of McKinney Historic Preservation Advisory Board will be offering a FREE half-day workshop to help owners of historic properties and construction professionals get a working knowledge on how to evaluate and repair or replace historic wooden windows.  According to the flyer, there are ways to make historic windows more energy efficient.

The presenter, Tom Clark, is a Historic Window Expert from Leeds Clark and has participated in over 2,800 window preservations all across the nation.  Model sash and frame parts showing a variety of appropriate treatments for historic windows will be available at the demonstration.

The  Wood Window Workshop will be on April 21st from 9:00 till 12:00 in the  Chapel at the Chestnut Square Historic Village in McKinney. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP by April 16th to T Ramey @ mckinneytexas.org (take the spaces out first).

And, seeing as this is a great excuse to slip in some shots of historic homes, here are some pictures from a recent walk around the District. I know nothing about windows and the choices below (and above) are random, just happening to be along my walk over the weekend.

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Home in the Historic District

Until next time,

Happy Shopping!

6 Responses to “Wooden Window Workshop Coming April 21st”

  1. Brandon

    Beth,

    Do you know where the second to last home in the window article is located. I see a for sale sign and I am interested.

    Reply
  2. Beth

    I’m pretty sure that that one was on North Bradley Street but I’ll make a point to walk by there tomorrow and check. When I walk in this part of the district, I tend to really like to walk down Oak and Bradley Streets.

    Reply
  3. The wooden window workshop London

    If ever you want to visit the UK we would love to show you what we do! We are called “The wooden window workshop” based in England we specialise in the restoration of timber windows. Check us out, I won’t leave a website link as I do not want you to think this is spam 🙂 but good to see we have kindred spirits across the pond!

    Reply
    • Beth

      How cool would that be to have imported windows from London? Thanks!

      Reply

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